Monday, 12 September 2016

Accessible Travel In The UK For Wheelchair Users

As an able-bodied traveller, I am lucky, I don't have to worry about accessibility when I am out and about on my travels but some people aren't so lucky. If you do have a disability which means you are wheelchair bound you do have to consider how easy it is to get to the tourist destination, including the parking facilities for wheelchair accessible vehicles, whether the destination has places to eat and shop with aisles wide enough for a wheelchair to get through and whether toilet facilities have handrails and wide enough doors to get,

The UK leads the way in equal opportunities and diversity and tourism businesses have obligations under the Equality Act 2010. This means that service providers must think ahead and take “reasonable” steps to address barriers that impede disabled people. When you think that 12billion is spent every year in England on a trip where a member of the party has an impairment, according to Visit Britain, you can see what an important issue this is.


Historic buildings do have restrictions though, and making sympathetic alterations can be a challenge, within the listed building status, but as you can see from the infographic below, places that you wouldn't think would be accessible really are. Did you know for example that St Paul's cathedral has a new lift enabling wheelchair users to access the upper crypt and that Edinburgh castle has it's own mobility vehicle to show those with accessibility difficulties around the fortress? You can even scale Schiehallion mountain in Scotland

Local to me, St Fagan's, the museum of Welsh life,  has ramps almost everywhere, dedicated disabled car parking, and a motorised Disabled Tour Vehicle (DTV) to transport visitors around the site. Whilst the Science Museum in London is fully wheelchair accessible and disabled visitors receive concessionary prices for the IMAX 3D cinema – with support workers admitted for free.


Are there any places you go to, or visit regularly that are particularly accessible for those with mobility problems? Let me know.

MOBILITY NATIONWIDE FINAL INFOGRAPHIC

*PR collaboration
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18 comments

  1. I never realised how difficult it was until I had a baby and had to transport him in a pram. Although mine is a temporary annoyance when travelling compared to people who are in wheelchairs. It's great that some places are really friendly to wheelchair users.

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  2. I can imagine how difficult it is for wheelchair tourists to move about especially in historical places like you mentioned. It's nice to know though that people are doing something about it.

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  3. The infographic is really sweet but also super helpful, and it is amazing that you are drawing attention to the lack of accommodations made for differently able people, they deserve to have stress-free travel opportunities too!

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  4. Some great picks and a real range. It must be so tricky - we had enough problems getting around places sometimes with one child in a buggy so I can imagine it's much worse for wheelchair users.

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  5. My grandad uses either a scooter or a wheelchair and it's amazing how difficult it is to take him places. It's so appreciated that more and more places are becoming accessible!

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  6. This is a great infographic, it must be awful going to places that are not catered for wheelchairs..

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  7. this post is so good and informative and what a range of places! I can only imagine how difficult it can be to get to different places or to explore if you're a wheelchair user but I am so pleased to see that for example there's that mountain in Scotland that is wheelchair friendly, that's awesome!

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  8. It's hard enough with little people walking with you and a stroller - I can't imagine how frustrated wheelchair users must become with so many places they can't get to. I love that there are some iconic places which are really making the effort though.

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  9. I never had to honk of this before but definitely think it's useful. My Nan is getting old so who knows. It's good that there are quite a few places that are so beautiful. Alina from The Fairytale Pretty Picture

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  10. More places should make sure that they are wheelchair friendly and it is great that St Paul's has caught on.

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  11. Travelling with disabled people of even pushchairs is tricky and London frustrates me the most as the underground is so user unfriendly. Nice to see places making an effort these days

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  12. That's a great travel guide and it's really good that they are providing facilities for tourists in wheel chairs too.

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  13. I think it is much better than it was whether you are in a wheelchair or have a pushchair but there is still a whole lot more work to be done x

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  14. This is great that there are so many places that allow wheelchair access

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  15. As newly disabled is welcome change to see an able bodied blogger tackle such a difficult subject. My wheelchair is slightly adapted so wider than normal and doesn't even fit in some hotel lift's! I love the info on Edinburgh Castle as it's somewhere I'd love to go with my husband. We are finding adaption to this life very challenging! Great post

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  16. Thank you for sharing information about accessible tourism and access in the UK.

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  17. Fab post. I never realised how difficult it was for mothers with buggies to move around until I had my twins. Twin buggies are not the easiest to manoeuvre. I can imagine what wheel chair users go through.

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  18. That's amazing, is also convenient for wheelchair users. x

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