Saturday, 15 August 2015

Win Tickets To Bletchley Park With Intel And Tots100 Ends 22/08

Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire was the site of the UK's government code and cypher school in the 40's. 

It wasn't until recently that I realised the important role Bletchley Park had in World War 2, and specifically Alan Turing's role in cracking the Enigma code - a code developed by the Germans to encrypt messages during the war.

You may have seen the film The Imitation Game where Alan Turing was played by Benedict Cumberbatch. This exceptionally gifted mathematician invented the Turing machine which helped crack the Enigma code whilst he was working at Bletchley Park.


Enigma, the German Cipher Machine used for sending encrypted messages
Copyright Everett Historical Shutterstock 

It is well known fact that the intelligence produced at Bletchley Park did in fact shorten the war by two to four years. The site is now an educational and historical attraction memorialising and celebrating those accomplishments. Visitors can explore, experience and enjoy the top-secret world of iconic WW2 Codebreaking Huts and Blocks set within its atmospheric Victorian estate. This interesting and exciting historical building has also been given the Tripadvisor Certificate of Excellence and is the perfect family attraction for enquiring minds.

Intel Security which was formerly McAfee, runs a brilliant international Cybersecurity Exhibition at Bletchley where you can learn about the ground-breaking work done there, as well as pick up tips and information on staying safe online today. 


Password security is a worry to me. We have so much personal information online these days and robust and impenetrable security is needed to keep all this information safe. Intel Security work hard to produce new innovative ways to stay safe online through the development of the latest software and hardware. An example of this is their True Key software where you can sign in without passwords. Live Safe is another example which helps shield you digital life from prying eyes. One subscription protects all your devices from virus and threat protection and includes secure account storage with authentication which uses face voice recognition. 

What do your children think the future holds in keeping personal information safe online?

Do your children think retina recognition is the way to go to access personal information? Or what about fingerprint technology, but is a live scan of your fingerprint fool proof? Maybe there will be a non invasive way of getting your DNA to use as unique identification. They may have different ideas, young minds are very creative. Just ask them what they think!

If you like the sound of Bletchely Park, you can win four tickets to visit courtesy of Intel and Tots100 by asking your children how they think personal information will be kept safe and how we will access data in the future. To enter follow the steps on the Raffelcopter application below. Good luck and stay safe online!


Terms and Conditions

The prize is available to UK residents aged 18 or over, except employees of Intel Security/Hotwire Pr (The Promoter) or anyone professionally associated with the promotion. An entry is received when you leave a comment. The competition is open from 15pm GMT on 11 August 2015 to 11.59pm GMT on 22 August 2015. Any entries outside of these times will not be counted. One winner will be selected by the Promoter from all eligible entries and will receive a four tickets to Bletchley Park (RRP £65). The decision of the Promoter in relation to the Promotion is final. No correspondence will be entered into. Winners will be contacted by email. Winners will be announced on the Tots100 website within 30 days of the closing date. By entering participants will be deemed to have accepted by the terms of conditions of the competition. All entry instructions form part of these Terms and Conditions. Promoter:Intel Security/Hotwire PR69 Wilson Street, London, EC2A 2BB

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45 comments

  1. Shame that nobody remember about Marian Rejewski, who was first to break Enigma, and then Alan Turing based on his method could creat his machine.

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  2. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bomba_(cryptography)

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  3. Certainly it will be wirelessly, but on a much grander and faster scale than we can today.

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  4. I don't like the idea of iris or fingerprint recognition in case someone decides to detach them from your body, although I think that highly unlikely for a school dinner! My daughter we'll all be going round on hoverboards and it will be hoverboard recognition - not sure I'll be using mine when I'm sat at my PC though!

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  5. While I had heard about Alan Turing and the Enigma code, I didn't know it really was as important as you describe in shortening the war. It's great to learn aobut codes and escurity. Password security is definitely a worry to me.

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  6. I like the direction it is going and would be fab to have chip & pin cards to access the internet at lighting speed with more protection

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  7. Bletchley Park was amazingly kept secret throughout the war. It probably shorted the war by at least 2 years! It was an incredible achievement.

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  8. all through the internet i suspect!

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  9. I think it will just get easier and easier, with less subscriptions for access to archives, etc, as everything becomes digitised.

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  10. I think that it's going to go a bit more VR in the future. A bit like Google glasses

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  11. I imagine at some point we'll have implants which allow us to pull up a virtual screen to surf the internet.

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  12. It will be something that we have never dreamt of and all today's technology will look so old fashioned, possibly we will have 'magic fingers' and everything will appear virtually so that only one person can see it

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  13. will be wirelessly but don't like the idea of biometrics

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  14. wirelessly but i do like the idea of finger print scanners

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  15. from chips located in our body @msedollyp

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  16. Wirelessly and some form of biometrics

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  17. I have always wanted to go to Bletchley Park. It's so sad that Alan Turing accomplished so much and then came to such a sad end.

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  18. I don't have kids but if I think about say, finger-scanning to access data, I still think there should be an extra step to be sure everything is secure.

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  19. Perhaps we should write it down

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  20. We'll have a little socket in our temples and plug into our computers with it

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  21. I think it will involve DNA Scanning !

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  22. I think that we'll access data through thought telepathy

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  23. Most likely all through the internet

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  24. finger printing to a cloud based system

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  25. An inspiring place.

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  26. Through thought probably

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  27. through iris and finger print scanning

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  28. Wirelessly and using parts of your body as identification

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  29. Definately wireless but not keen on fingerprint or iris detection as these parts can be removed. Possibly a chip within your body

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  30. I don't like the iris or fingerprint scanning but chip and pin would be good or voice recognition :)

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  31. I think it will be wirelessly and also some kind of Dna

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  32. It's so difficult to work out as technology changes so quickly. I think iris screening will become more common. The internet will continue to be a huge influence.
    Victoria B

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  33. Pauline Burroughs22 August 2015 at 14:26

    Maybe we should all be micro chipped at birth. Could also do away with passports then x

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  34. DNA and eye sensors.

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  35. iwish i had an answer then maybe we could all live together in harmony instead of warring all the time

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